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2d6: All Combinations

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Rolls Totals

1-1 1-2 1-3 1-4 1-5 1-6
2-1 2-2 2-3 2-4 2-5 2-6
3-1 3-2 3-3 3-4 3-5 3-6
4-1 4-2 4-3 4-4 4-5 4-6
5-1 5-2 5-3 5-4 5-5 5-6
6-1 6-2 6-3 6-4 6-5 6-6

2 3 4 5 6 7
3 4 5 6 7 8
4 5 6 7 8 9
5 6 7 8 9 10
6 7 8 9 10 11
  7   8   9 10 11 12

Next lets take a look at 2d6. This is a bit more complicated, so we're going to list the total combinations in one table and the totals right next to it.

The table on the left (labeled Rolls) shows all the possible ways that 2d6 can be rolled. Feel free to test this for yourself; you'll need 72d6 to do so, but you're a gamer -- I'm sure you have that many dice lying around somewhere... :-)

The table on the right (labeled Totals) shows the total of each roll. Frex, the first row of the Rolls table co-responds to the first row of the Totals table: a 2d6 roll that showed a 1 and a 1 (1-1) would be a total of 2, a 2d6 roll that showed a 1 and a 2 (1-2) would be a total of 3, a 2d6 roll that showed a 1 and a 3 (1-3) would be a total of 4, etc.

There are a couple of things we can see immediately in the Totals table. The highest and lowest totals show up less often than the "middle" totals. A 2 (or a 12) only shows up once in the table. When you throw the dice, of the 36 possible Rolls, only one combination will give a total of 2. Only one combination will give a total of 12. A 7 shows up much more often than a 2 or a 12. There are six ways to get a total of seven, so a 7 will be rolled six times more often than a 2.

Note that the total number of possible totals is equal to the number of faces on each die multiplied together. If we were rolling 2d4, the total number of combinations would be 4x4 or 16. Rolling 1d4+1d8 would be 4x8 or 32. The total number of possible totals on 2d6 is 36. We'll be using that number in our next table.

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Copyright © 1999 Bob Simpson. All Rights Reserved.
Last updated: 2001 Nov 29







Last modified: 2002-Feb-14 19:40:36

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